Expatriate Owl

A politically-incorrect perspective that does not necessarily tow the party line, on various matters including but not limited to taxation, academia, government and religion.

Friday, January 13, 2006

ACLU and the Praying Marines

Well, folks, this one is making the e-mail rounds again. The one where the American Civil Liberties Union supposedly objected to Marines praying in public at a Marine Corps ceremony.

In the strictest sense, it is disinformation. There are several websites that document and analyze and confirm/debunk these types of "urban legends." These include, but are not limited to, snopes.com, urbanlegens.about.com, breakthechain.org, truthorfiction.com, et cetera. Websites such as these are valuable resources for substantiating your info. We check out our food to make sure that it is kosher; ascertaining that our information is kosher is no less important.

Regardless of your views regarding the ACLU, you are not justified in lying about it (and you don't have to lie because there are sufficient truthful FACTS about the ACLU which can reduce them to absurdity). So stick to the facts and don't lie.

One relevant fact in this issue is the ACLU's own response to the e-mail in question. On the ACLU's own website, the ACLU has this to say:



"Why does the ACLU object to federal employees bowing their heads?

The ACLU has no knowledge about the photograph of Marines praying that has circulated on the Internet. The ACLU has also never had a spokesperson -- quoted by news organizations as "Lucius Traveler" -- by this name."



The ACLU's purported "answer" is a non-sequitur. It only denies knowledge of the supposed story (probably a valid denial), but DOES NOT address the question of the ACLU's objections (or absence thereof) to Federal employees bowing their heads and praying on government time.

Am I reading too much into this? Given some of the other documented and substantiated wacko positions espoused by the ACLU, I wouldn't be so sure that the ACLU does not oppose government employees, military or civilian, praying on government time.

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